Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 13.600 resultados de búsqueda
  1. Anuncios
    relacionados con: Sir Robert Peel, 3rd Baronet
  2. 100,000+ usuarios visitaron peoplelooker.com el mes pasado

    Explore Baronet's Public Records, Phone, Address, Social Media & More. Look Up Any Name. Explore Baronet's 1. Phone Number 2. Address 3. Email & More. Lookup Any Name - Try Today!

  3. Descubre la librería más grande. Todos tus libros en español e inglés a un click

  1. Sir Robert Peel, 3rd Baronet, GCB, PC (4 May 1822 – 9 May 1895) was a British Peelite, Liberal and from 1884 until 1886 Conservative Member of Parliament (MP). Eldest son of the prime minister Robert Peel, he was educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford and entered the Diplomatic Service in 1844.

  2. 10/04/2019 · About Sir Robert Peel, 3rd Baronet. Sir Robert Peel, 3rd Baronet GCB, PC (4 May 1822 – 9 May 1895) was a British Peelite and later Liberal politician. The eldest son of the prime minister Sir Robert Peel, 2nd Baronet, he was educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford and entered the Diplomatic Service in 1844.

    • May 04, 1822
    • Michael Lawrence Rhodes
    • May 09, 1895 (73)
    • 3rd Baronet
  3. Son of 2nd Baronet Sir Robert Peel. MP for Tamworth.

    • 4 May 1822England
    • 181195158 · View Source
    • 9 May 1895 (aged 73)England
  4. Sir Robert Peel, 3rd Baronet, GCB, PC (4 May 1822 – 9 May 1895) was a British Peelite and later Liberal politician. The eldest son of the prime minister Robert Peel, he was educated at Harrow and Christ Church, Oxford and entered the Diplomatic Service in 1844. He served as Member of Parliament for Tamworth, his father's constituency, from 1850 until 1880, for Huntingdon from 1884 and for ...

  5. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Robert_PeelRobert Peel - Wikipedia

    • Early Life
    • Home Secretary
    • Whigs in Power
    • First Term as Prime Minister
    • Leader of The Opposition
    • Second Term as Prime Minister
    • Later Career and Death
    • Family
    • Memory and Legacy
    • Memorials

    Peel was born at Chamber Hall, Bury, Lancashire, to the industrialist and parliamentarian Sir Robert Peel, 1st Baronet, and his wife Ellen Yates. His father was one of the richest textile manufacturers of the early Industrial Revolution. The family moved from Lancashire to Drayton Manor near Tamworth, Staffordshire; the manor house has since been demolished, the site occupied by Drayton Manor Theme Park. Peel received his early education from a clergyman tutor in Bury and at a clergyman's local school in Tamworth. He may also have attended Bury Grammar School or Hipperholme Grammar School, though evidence for either is anecdotal rather than textual. He started at Harrow School in February 1800. At Harrow he was a contemporary of Lord Byron, who recalled of Peel that "we were on good terms" and that "I was always in scrapes, and he never". On Harrow's Speech Day in 1804, Peel and Byron acted part of Virgil's Aeneid, Peel playing Turnus and Byron playing Latinus. In 1805 Peel matricul...

    Peel was considered one of the rising stars of the Tory party, first entering the cabinet in 1822 as Home Secretary. As Home Secretary, he introduced a number of important reforms of British criminal law. He reduced the number of crimes punishable by death, and simplified the law by repealing a large number of criminal statutes and consolidating their provisions into what are known as Peel's Acts. He reformed the gaol system, introducing payment for gaolers and education for the inmates in the Gaols Act 1823. In 1827 the Prime Minister Lord Liverpool became incapacitated and was replaced by George Canning. Peel resigned as home secretary. Canning favoured Catholic emancipation, while Peel had been one of its most outspoken opponents (earning the nickname "Orange Peel", with Orange the colour of the anti-Catholic Orange Order). George Canning himself died less than four months later and, after the brief premiership of Lord Goderich, Peel returned to the post of Home Secretary under t...

    The middle and working classes in England at that time, however, were clamouring for reform, and Catholic Emancipation was only one of the ideas in the air. The Tory ministry refused to bend on other issues and were swept out of office in 1830 in favour of the Whigs. The following few years were extremely turbulent, but eventually enough reforms were passed that King William IV felt confident enough to invite the Tories to form a ministry again in succession to those of Lord Grey and Lord Melbourne in 1834.Peel was selected as prime minister but was in Italy at the time, so Wellington acted as a caretaker for three weeks until Peel's return.

    The Tory Ministry was a minority government and depended on Whig goodwill for its continued existence. Parliament was dissolved in December 1834 and a general election called. Voting took place in January and February 1835, and Peel's supporters gained around 100 seats, but this was not enough to give them a majority. As his statement of policy at the general election of January 1835, Peel issued the Tamworth Manifesto. This document was the basis on which the modern Conservative Party was founded. In it Peel pledged that the Conservatives would endorse modestreform. The Whigs formed a compact with Daniel O'Connell's Irish Radical members to repeatedly defeat the government on various bills. Eventually, after only about 100 days in government, Peel's ministry resigned out of frustration and the Whigs under Lord Melbourne returned to power. The only real achievement of Peel's first administration was a commission to review the governance of the Church of England. This ecclesiastical...

    In May 1839 he was offered another chance to form a government, this time by the new monarch, Queen Victoria. However, this too would have been a minority government, and Peel felt he needed a further sign of confidence from his Queen. Lord Melbourne had been Victoria's confidant since her accession in 1837, and many of the higher posts in Victoria's household were held by the wives and female relatives of Whigs; there was some feeling that Victoria had allowed herself to be too closely associated with the Whig party. Peel therefore asked that some of this entourage be dismissed and replaced with their Conservative counterparts, provoking the so-called Bedchamber Crisis.Victoria refused to change her household, and despite pleadings from the Duke of Wellington, relied on assurances of support from Whig leaders. Peel refused to form a government, and the Whigs returned to power.

    Economic and financial reforms

    Peel finally had a chance to head a majority government following the election of July 1841. Peel came to office during an economic recession which had seen a slump in world trade and a budget deficit of £7.5 million run up by the Whigs. Confidence in banks and businesses was low, and a trade deficit existed. To raise revenue Peel's 1842 budget saw the re-introduction of the income tax, removed previously at the end of the Napoleonic War. The rate was 7d in the pound, or just under 3 per cent...

    Factory Act

    Peel's promise of modest reform was held to, and the second most famous bill of this ministry, while "reforming" in 21st-century eyes, was in fact aimed at the reformers themselves, with their constituency among the new industrial rich. The Factory Act 1844 acted more against these industrialists than it did against the traditional stronghold of the Conservatives, the landed gentry, by restricting the number of hours that children and women could work in a factory and setting rudimentary safe...

    Assassination attempt

    In 1843 Peel was the target of a failed assassination attempt; a criminally insane Scottish wood turner named Daniel M'Naghten stalked him for several days before, on 20 January, killing Peel's personal secretary Edward Drummond thinking he was Peel, which led to the formation of the controversial criminal defense of insanity.

    Peel did, however, retain a hard core of supporters, known as Peelites, and at one point in 1849 was actively courted by the Whig/Radical coalition. He continued to stand on his conservative principles, however, and refused. Nevertheless, he was influential on several important issues, including the furtherance of British free trade with the repeal of the Navigation Acts. Peel was a member of the committee which controlled the House of Commons Library, and on 16 April 1850 was responsible for passing the motion that controlled its scope and collection policy for the rest of the century. Peel was thrown from his horse while riding on Constitution Hill in London on 29 June 1850. The horse stumbled on top of him, and he died three days later on 2 July at the age of 62 due to a broken collarbonerupturing his subclavian vessels. His Peelite followers, led by Lord Aberdeen and William Gladstone, went on to fuse with the Whigs as the Liberal Party.

    Peel became engaged to Julia Floyd (1795–1859) (daughter of General Sir John Floyd, 1st Baronet, and his first wife Rebecca Darke) in March 1820 and was married on 8 June 1820.They had seven children: 1. Julia Peel (30 April 1821 – 14 August 1893). She married George Child Villiers, 6th Earl of Jersey, on 12 July 1841. They had five children. She married her second husband, Charles Brandling, on 12 September 1865. 2. Sir Robert Peel, 3rd Baronet (4 May 1822 – 9 May 1895). He married Lady Emily Hayon 17 June 1856. They had five children. 3. Sir Frederick Peel (26 October 1823 – 6 June 1906). He married Elizabeth Shelley (niece of the poet Percy Shelleythrough his brother John: died 30 July 1865) on 12 August 1857. He was remarried to Janet Pleydell-Bouverie on 3 September 1879. 4. Sir William Peel(2 November 1824 – 27 April 1858). 5. John Floyd Peel (24 May 1827 – 21 April 1910). He married Annie Jenny in 1851. 6. Arthur Wellesley Peel(3 August 1829 – 24 October 1912). He married Ade...

    In his lifetime many critics called him a traitor to the Tory cause, or as "a Liberal wolf in sheep's clothing", because his final position reflected liberal ideas. The consensus view of scholars for much of the 20th century idealised Peel in heroic terms. Historian Boyd Hiltonwrote that he was portrayed as: Biographer Norman Gash wrote that Peel "looked first, not to party, but to the state; not to programmes, but to national expediency".Gash added that among his personal qualities were, "administrative skill, capacity for work, personal integrity, high standards, a sense of duty [and] an outstanding intellect". Gash emphasised the role of personality on Peel's political career: Peel was the first serving British Prime Minister to have his photograph taken. Peel is also featured on the cover of The Beatles' Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Bandalbum. A 2021 study in the Economic Journalfound that the repeal of the corn laws adversely affected the welfare of the top 10% of income ea...

    Statues

    Statues of Sir Robert Peel are found in the following British and Australian locations: 1. Statue by Edward Hodges Bailyin Bury 2. Statue in Parliament Square, London 3. Statue in Piccadilly Gardens, Manchester 4. Statue in Woodhouse Moor, Leeds 5. Statue in George Square, Glasgow 6. Statue in Peel Park, Bradford 7. Statue near Gawsworth Old Hall 8. Statue in Edgbaston, Birmingham

    Public houses and hotels

    The following public houses, bars or hotels are named after Peel:

    Other memorials

    1. Peel Park, Bradford is named after Sir Robert Peel. It is one of the largest parks in the city, and indeed Yorkshire. 2. Peel Tower Monument, built on top of Holcombe Hill in Ramsbottom, Bury. 3. The Sir Robert Peel Hospital in Tamworth. 4. A small monument in the centre of the town of Dronfieldin Derbyshire. Nearby is the Peel Centre, a community centre in a former Methodist church. 5. Peel Streets in the CBD of Melbourne, and in Collingwood, both in Victoria, Australia. 6. Peel Street in...

  6. Title: Robert Peel collection Creator: Clements, William L. (William Lawrence), 1861-1934 Inclusive dates: 1822-1870 Bulk dates: 1822-1842 Extent: 24 items Abstract: This collection is made up of 23 manuscripts by and related to Sir Robert Peel, 1st baronet; Sir Robert Peel, 2nd baronet; and Sir Robert Peel, 3rd baronet.

  7. 29/12/2017 · Sir Robert Peel 2nd Baronet Conservative 1841 to 1846, 1834 to 1835 ... Arthur James Balfour, Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 3rd Marquess of Salisbury, Archibald Primrose, ...

  1. Anuncios
    relacionados con: Sir Robert Peel, 3rd Baronet
  2. 100,000+ usuarios visitaron peoplelooker.com el mes pasado

    Explore Baronet's Public Records, Phone, Address, Social Media & More. Look Up Any Name. Explore Baronet's 1. Phone Number 2. Address 3. Email & More. Lookup Any Name - Try Today!

  3. Descubre la librería más grande. Todos tus libros en español e inglés a un click