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  1. The Christian community that developed into what is now known as the Russian Orthodox Church is traditionally said to have been founded by the Apostle Andrew, who is thought to have visited Scythia and Greek colonies along the northern coast of the Black Sea.

    • ROC
    • 110 million (95 million in Russia, total of 15 million in the linked autonomous churches)
  2. Russian Orthodoxy ( Russian: Русское православие) is the body of several Churches within the larger communion of Eastern Orthodox Christianity, whose liturgy is or was traditionally conducted in Church Slavonic language. Most Churches of the Russian Orthodox tradition are part of the Eastern Orthodox Church . Contents 1 Origin 2 Church bodies

    • Christianization of The Rus
    • Under Mongol Rule
    • 15th Century
    • Changes and Reforms
    • Autocephaly and Reorganization
    • 17th Century
    • Territorial Expansion
    • Abolition of Patriarchy and The Holy Synod
    • Fin-De-Siècle Religious Renaissance
    • Russian Revolution

    The Catholic ChirchConstantinople's greatest mission outreach was to areas known as Kievan Rus that are now the states of Russia, Ukraine and Belarus. Catholic Christianity (as all Christians were then Catholics) was introduced into Kievan Rus by Greek missionaries from the Byzantine Empire in the 9th century. In 863–869, Saint Cyril and Saint Meth...

    The Russian church enjoyed a favoured position while parts of Russia lay under Mongol rule from the 13th-15th century. Sergius, as well as the metropolitans St. Peter (1308–26) and St. Alexius (1354–78), supported the rising power of the principality of Moscow. The church enjoyed protection for its land and buildings as well as freedom from taxes. ...

    During the 15th century the Russian Church was pivotal in the survival and life of the Russian state. Such holy figures as Sergius of Radonezh and Metropolitan Alexis helped the country to withstand years of Tartaroppression, and to expand both economically and spiritually. At the Council of Florence 1439, a group of Orthodox leaders agreed upon te...

    The reign of Ivan III and his successor was plagued by numerous heresies and controversies. One party, led by Nil Sorsky and Vassian Kosoy, called for secularisation of monastic properties. They were oppugned by the influential Joseph of Volotsk, who defended ecclesiastical ownership of land and property. The sovereign's position fluctuated, but ev...

    During the reign of Tsar Fyodor I, his brother-in-law Boris Godunov, who was effectively running the government, contacted the Ecumenical Patriarch, who "was much embarrassed for want of funds," with a view to elevating the status of the Moscow Metroplis to a patriarchate. Eventually, after protracted negotiations, in January 1589 the Moscow Patria...

    The beginning of the 17th century proved to be a troublesome period for the Moscow state, following the death of the last Tsar of the Rurik Dynasty, Feodor Ivanovich, in 1598. The Poles and Swedes repeatedly invaded Russia from the west, with the Polish prince Władysław Vasa elected the Russian Tsar by the Seven Boyars in 1610. At this time of poli...

    In the late 17th and the next two centuries, due to the expansion of the boundaries of the Russian state, the Russian Church experienced phenomenal geographic expansion too. In 1686, the Moscow Patriarchate obtained a part of the Metropolis of Kiev, which until then comprised the Orthodox population on the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth, — from the...

    In 1700, upon the death of Patriarch Adrian, Peter I prevented a successor from being named. In 1721, following the advice of Feofan Prokopovich, the patriarchate of Moscow was replaced with the Most Holy Governing Synod to govern the church. The Holy Governing Synod was modeled after the state-controlled synods of the Lutheran Church of Sweden and...

    During the final decades of the imperial order in Russia many educated Russians sought to return to the Church and revitalize their faith. No less evident were non-conformist paths of spiritual searching known as God-Seeking. Writers, artists, and intellectuals in large numbers were drawn to private prayer, mysticism, spiritualism, theosophy, and E...

    In 1914 in Russia, there were 55,173 Russian Orthodox churches and 29,593 chapels, 112,629 priests and deacons, 550 monasteries and 475 conventswith a total of 95,259 monks and nuns. The year 1917 was a major turning point for the history of Russia, and also the Russian Orthodox Church. The Russian empire was dissolved and the Tsarist government – ...

  3. Russian Orthodox Church From Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Cathedral of Christ the Saviour in Moscow The Russian Orthodox Church of the Moscow Patriarchate are Christians who are united under the Patriarch of Moscow, who in turn is in communion with the other patriarchs and primates of the Eastern Orthodox Church .

    • Overview
    • History
    • Organisation

    The Russian Old Orthodox Church is an Eastern Orthodox Church of the Old Believers tradition, born of a schism within the Russian Orthodox Church during the 17th century. This jurisdiction incorporated those Old Believer groups which refused to accept the authority of Belokrinitskaya Hierarchy, est. 1846. It was also known as Novozybkov Hierarchy. ...

    The Russian Old Orthodox Church was formed from the groups of Old Believers who insisted on preserving the traditional church structure and hierarchy, but refused to accept the authority of Metropolitan Amvrosii who converted in 1846 and founded the Belokrinitskaya Hierarchy, due to some canonical problems with his conversion and the ordination of ...

    The Holy Council is the highest legislative body, which elects the Patriarch and the members of the Chief Ecclesiastical Council. Today, the Old-Orthodox Church has six hierarchs and about more than 10 parishes on the former Soviet Union territory and four parishes in Romania.

  4. At the jubilee Council of Bishops in 2000, the Russian Orthodox Church canonized Tsar Nicholas and his family, along with more than 1,000 martyrs and confessors. This Council also enacted a document on relations between the Church and the secular authorities, censoring servility and complaisance.

  5. Russian Orthodox Autonomous Church From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia The Russian Orthodox Autonomous Church ( ROAC, Russian: Российская православная автономная церковь, РПАЦ) is a non-canonical Russian Orthodox church body. ROAC identifies as part of True Orthodoxy.