Yahoo Search Búsqueda en la Web

  1. Cerca de 44 resultados de búsqueda

  1. Count William I of Nassau-Siegen (10 April 1487 – 6 October 1559), German: Wilhelm I. Graf von Nassau-Siegen, official titles: Graf zu Nassau, Katzenelnbogen, Vianden und Diez, nicknamed ‘the Elder’ (German: ‘der Ältere’) or ‘the Rich’ (German: ‘der Reiche’), was since 1516 Count of Nassau-Siegen (a part of the County of Nassau) and of half Diez.

  2. William IV (Guillaume Alexander; French: Guillaume Alexandre; 22 April 1852 – 25 February 1912) reigned as the Grand Duke of Luxembourg from 17 November 1905 until his death. He succeeded his father, Adolphe. William was a Protestant, the religion of the House of Nassau.

  3. William the Silent (24 April 1533 – 10 July 1584), also known as William the Taciturn (translated from Dutch: Willem de Zwijger), or, more commonly in the Netherlands, William of Orange (Dutch: Willem van Oranje), was the main leader of the Dutch Revolt against the Spanish Habsburgs that set off the Eighty Years' War (1568–1648) and resulted in the formal independence of the United ...

  4. William II enjoyed considerable popularity in what is now Belgium (then the Southern Netherlands), as well as in parts of the rest of the Netherlands for his affability and moderation, and in 1830, on the outbreak of the Belgian revolution, he did his utmost in Brussels as a peace broker, to bring about a settlement based on administrative autonomy for the southern provinces, under the House ...

  5. William, Prince of Orange (Willem Nicolaas Alexander Frederik Karel Hendrik; 4 September 1840 – 11 June 1879), was heir apparent to the Dutch throne as the eldest son of King William III from 17 March 1849 until his death.

  6. William I (Willem Frederik, Prince of Orange-Nassau; 24 August 1772 – 12 December 1843) was a Prince of Orange, the King of the Netherlands and Grand Duke of Luxembourg. He was the son of the last Stadtholder of the Dutch Republic , who went into exile to London in 1795 because of the Batavian Revolution .

  7. Charles William Ferdinand entered the military, serving during the Seven Years' War of 1756–63. He joined the allied north-German forces of the Hanoverian Army of Observation, whose task was to protect Hanover (in personal union with the Kingdom of Great Britain) and the surrounding states from invasion by the French.