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  1. William Cecil, I Barón Burghley (Lincolnshire, 13 de septiembre de 1520 – Londres, 4 de agosto de 1598), fue un estadista inglés, principal consejero de la reina Isabel I durante la mayor parte de su reinado, dos veces secretario de Estado (1550-1553 y 1558-1572) y Lord Alto Tesorero desde 1572.

  2. William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley KG PC (13 September 1520 – 4 August 1598) was an English statesman, the chief adviser of Queen Elizabeth I for most of her reign, twice Secretary of State (1550–1553 and 1558–1572) and Lord High Treasurer from 1572. In his description in the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, Albert Pollard wrote ...

  3. 09/09/2020 · William Cecil’s name is indelibly linked to the reign of Elizabeth I. But to reduce his vast influence in the Elizabethan era to his relationship with the queen does him a disservice, says Janet Dickinson. Ahead of the 500th anniversary of Cecil’s birth, she considers the prolific work and legacy of one of the Tudor queen’s most famous advisers…

  4. 10/06/2020 · William Cecil was born in Lincolnshire in 1520 CE, the son of a Welsh minor noble who had gained prominence by supporting the first Tudor king, Henry VII of England (r. 1485-1509 CE). William was sent to Cambridge for his studies, where he was educated in humanist and Protestant ideas.

    • Publishing Director
  5. William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley, principal adviser to England’s Queen Elizabeth I through most of her reign. Cecil was a master of Renaissance statecraft, whose talents as a diplomat, politician, and administrator won him high office and a peerage.

  6. 17/03/2015 · Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley, was one of the major political figures in the reign of Elizabeth I. Burghley held all the major political posts in the land and was to all intents the most powerful non-royal in England and Wales. William Cecil was born on September 13th 1520. He was born into a …

    • Formative Years
    • First Period in Government
    • Lying Low
    • Early Years of Elizabeth’s Reign
    • Later Years

    Sir William Cecil, Lord Burghley was the longest-servingminister of any of the Tudor monarchs, and one of the more successful in thathe died in his own bed, still in favour with his sovereign. Cecil was born in a small town in Lincolnshire, into afamily with royal connections. His grandfather served Lady Margaret Beaufort,and his father was a page in Henry VIII’s chamber, even being a participant atthe Field of Cloth of Gold. His early education was typical of a man of the times –chantry school, followed by education at one of the new schools being foundedby the Humanist clerics of the time, then Cambridge when he was fourteen. Whilst at St John’s, Cambridge, he became part of the circleof scholars and reformers who would influence religious policy in the secondhalf of the sixteenth century. He became a committed adherent of the Protestantfaith, and spent most of his public career believing that the promotion andprotection of ‘Godly’ religion at home, and abroad was his vocation. Af...

    On the accession of Edward VI in January 1547, Hertford(newly promoted to Duke of Somerset) became Lord Protector. Cecil continued towork for him in a secretarial capacity, which included tasks as diverse asdealing with requests and petitions to the Protector, and accompanying the armyin a quasi-judicial capacity. Cecil was present at the Battle of Pinkie Cleugh– a severe defeat for the Scots. He adopted Somerset’s vision of a single, Protestant,British state and much of his later policy was aimed at achieving this outcome. During Edward’s reign, England began to move towards a trulyProtestant reformation, with the introduction of the 1549 Book of Common Prayer,and it is probable that Cecil was involved in planning it. By the end of 1549,however, his master, Somerset, was rapidly losing friends and influence. Tworebellions and a complete lack of ability to get on with his fellow councillorshad made his colleagues restive, and he was shunted aside. Cecil spent anunpleasant five weeks...

    During the reign of Mary, Cecil kept a fairly low profile, although he was not completely out of public life. He sat in the Commons, and also undertook a couple of government-sponsored trips abroad, one of which was to escort Cardinal Reginald Pole home after twenty-five years of exile. Despite their different religious perspectives, Cecil and Pole seem to have got on well. In this period, Cecil continued to build his relationship with Elizabeth, and, when she heard the news of her sister’s death on 17thNovember 1558, he was with her at Hatfield. He was immediately appointed as her Secretary, and was the first of her new Privy Council to be sworn in. She trusted him completely to do his utmost for her, and for the state. For the next forty years, Cecil was Elizabeth’s closest advisor, although he was never her only minister, and she did not always take his advice. Their personal relationship was respectful and trusting, but quite unlike the emotional relationships that Elizabeth had...

    The first decade of the Queen’s reign focused onimplementing a religious settlement. This was done in the Acts of Uniformityand Supremacy of 1559. The results were probably more conservative in doctrinethan Cecil would have liked, but it was a structure he could support. The otherkey policy objective of the 1560s for Cecil was to persuade Elizabeth to marryand beget an heir. This she avoided doing, whether for emotional or politicalreasons can never be conclusively determined. Failure by Elizabeth to producean heir was very likely to result in the inheritance of her throne by Mary,Queen of Scots – an idea which Cecil loathed. By the end of the decade, the succession problemand thereligious problem had fused into one when the Queen of Scots was deposed by herrebellious nobles and sought help from Elizabeth. Elizabeth was inclined togive it, but Cecil made every effort to dissuade her. The poorly organisedRising of the Northern Earls in 1569, followed by a Bull of Excommunicationagain...

    Increased penalties for Catholics were introduced, andBurghley finally found evidence to implicate Mary, Queen of Scots in a plot tomurder Elizabeth. He persuaded the Queen to have her cousin tried. Followingconviction, it was many weeks before Elizabeth could be induced to sign thedeath warrant, and when she did, almost immediately recalling it, Burghley tookthe initiative and had had Mary executed as quickly as possible. This resultedin a clash with Elizabeth that banished him for several months. Following the victory over the Armada in 1588, Burghley, bythen in his late sixties, hoped to slow down. He lost his mother, wife anddaughter within the space of a few months, and his health deteriorated. Elizabeth, however, was not inclined to lose the support ofher oldest and best minister, and he continued in office. During the 1590s newthreats arose – rebellion in Ireland, faction at home as Burghley’s formerward, the Earl of Essex and his son, Robert Cecil, clashed for supremacy.Spai...

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