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  1. William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, PC, PC (Ire), FRS (15 March 1779 – 24 November 1848), in some sources called Henry William Lamb, was a British Whig politician who served as Home Secretary (1830–1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835–1841).

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › William_IVWilliam IV - Wikipedia

    William IV (William Henry; 21 August 1765 – 20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland and King of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death in 1837. The third son of George III , William succeeded his elder brother George IV , becoming the last king and penultimate monarch of Britain's House of Hanover .

  3. He intended to marry Lady Caroline Ponsonby, his cousin, but she married William Lamb, which he found devastating. Devonshire died at Hardwick Hall, Derbyshire, in January 1858, aged 67, and left an estate valued at £500,000 in his will. As he was unmarried the dukedom passed to his cousin William Cavendish, 2nd Earl of Burlington.

  4. Wikipedia is written by volunteer editors and hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation, a non-profit organization that also hosts a range of other volunteer projects: Commons Free media repository

  5. Portrait of Emily Lamb, then Countess Cowper, by William Owen, ca. 1810 In 1839, Palmerston married his mistress of many years, the noted Whig hostess Emily Lamb , widow of Peter Leopold Louis Francis Nassau Clavering-Cowper, 5th Earl Cowper (1778–1837) and sister of William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne , prime minister (1834 and 1835–1841).

  6. Emily Temple, Viscountess Palmerston (née Lamb, later Clavering-Cowper; 1787–1869), styled The Honourable Emily Lamb from 1787 to 1805 and Countess Cowper from 1805 to 1839, was a leading figure of the Almack's social set, sister to Prime Minister Lord Melbourne, wife to the 5th Earl Cowper, and subsequently wife to another Prime Minister Lord Palmerston

  7. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Empty_stringEmpty string - Wikipedia

    Formal theory. Formally, a string is a finite, ordered sequence of characters such as letters, digits or spaces. The empty string is the special case where the sequence has length zero, so there are no symbols in the string.