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  1. Anne of Denmark (Danish: Anna; 12 December 1574 – 2 March 1619) was the wife of King James VI and I; as such, she was Queen of Scotland from their marriage on 20 August 1589 and Queen of England and Ireland from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until her death in 1619.

  2. 7 de ene. de 2013 · In December 1593 Anna was reported ‘to be very well enclyned unto Catholique religion, beeing thereunto partly perswaded by the Lady Huntley, of whome she hathe receaved a Catholique Catechisme in French, which she much esteemeth’. 10 Anna had learned French prior to her marriage, in order to have a common language with her husband and Scottish …

    • Maureen M. Meikle, Helen M. Payne
    • 2013
  3. 8 de dic. de 2022 · The daughter of King Frederick II of Denmark and Norway, Anne was married to James in 1589. Her Lutheran upbringing and frivolous nature cost her the affection of James’s Scottish Presbyterian subjects, and James alienated Anne by entrusting the upbringing of their first son, Prince Henry (1594–1612), to John Erskine, 2nd earl of Mar.

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
  4. Anne of Denmark: Nacimiento: 12 de diciembre de 1574 jul. Skanderborg Slot : Fallecimiento: 2 de marzo de 1619 Hampton Court (Reino Unido) Causa de muerte: Edema: Sepultura: Abadía de Westminster: Nacionalidad: Danesa: Religión: Luteranismo: Lengua materna: Danés: Familia; Familia: Casa de Oldemburgo: Padres: Federico II de Dinamarca Sofía de Mecklenburg-Güstrow: Cónyuge

  5. www.liquisearch.com › anne_of_denmark › religionAnne of Denmark - Religion

    Religion A further source of difference between Anne and James was the issue of religion; for example, she abstained from the Anglican communion at her coronation. Anne had been brought up a Lutheran, but she may have discreetly converted to Catholicism at some point, a politically embarrassing scenario which alarmed ministers of the Scottish Kirk and caused suspicion in Anglican England.