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  1. Frederick O'Neal "Fred" Vinson es un exjugador y actual entrenador de baloncesto estadounidense que jugó dos temporadas en la NBA, además de hacerlo en ligas menores de su país, en Venezuela y en ligas europeas. Con 1,93 metros de estatura, lo hacía en la posición de base. En la actualidad es entrenador asistente de los New Orleans Pelicans.

    • Frederick O'Neal Vinson
    • Estadounidense
  2. 18 de ene. de 2023 · Fred M. Vinson, in full Frederick Moore Vinson, (born Jan. 22, 1890, Louisa, Ky., U.S.—died Sept. 8, 1953, Washington, D.C.), American lawyer and 13th chief justice of the United States, who was a vigorous supporter of a broad interpretation of federal governmental powers. Following completion of his legal studies at Centre College in Danville, Ky.

    • The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica
    • Vinson Played A Leading Role in Creating New Deal Programs
    • Court Was Contentious During Vinsons's Tenure
    • Vinson Upheld National Security Over Individual Rights
    • Vinson Had A Mixed First Amendment Record
    • Vinson Was A Moderate on Race Relations

    Frederick Vinson was born in Louisa, Ky., on Jan. 22, 1890. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1922, and while in Congress he befriended Missouri senator Harry S. Truman, who became his long-time friend. While in Washington, Vinson played a leading role in creating New Deal programs. In 1938 President Franklin D. R...

    During his seven-year tenure, Vinson found it difficult to work with a contentious Court dominated by strong personalities, including Hugo L. Black, Felix Frankfurter, Robert H. Jackson, and William O. Douglas. Assigning himself only a few majority opinions in major cases, he allowed his brethren to define and lead the debate over the constitutiona...

    In two major cases, Vinson upheld the government’s interest in protecting national security in spite of the individual rights at stake. Vinson’s opinion for the Court in American Communications Association v. Douds (1950)avoided the free-speech issue and upheld the constitutionality of Section 9 of the Taft-Hartley Act requiring labor union officer...

    Vinson’s record was mixed when national security issues were not as prominent. In Feiner v. New York (1951), he wrote the majority opinion convicting a speaker who refused to stop giving a haranguing speech to a crowd when requested by the police to do so. However, Vinson also wrote the majority decision in Kunz v. New York (1951), deciding that a ...

    The Vinson Court took decisive action against racial discrimination in housing, education, transportation, criminal justice, voting rights, and labor relations. A moderate on race relations, Vinson wrote unanimous opinions in two major cases. In Shelley v. Kraemer (1948), he held that judicial enforcement of racially restrictive housing covenants v...

  3. Frederick "Fred" Moore Vinson (January 22, 1890 – September 8, 1953) was an American attorney and politician who served as the 13th chief justice of the United States from 1946 until his death in 1953. Vinson was one of the few Americans to have served in all three branches of the U.S. government.

    • Julia Dixon ​(m. .mw-parser-output .tooltip-dotted{border-bottom:1px dotted;cursor:help}1924)​
    • Democratic
    • Vinson Played A Leading Role in Creating New Deal Programs
    • Court Was Contentious During Vinsons's Tenure
    • Vinson Upheld National Security Over Individual Rights
    • Vinson Had A Mixed First Amendment Record
    • Vinson Was A Moderate on Race Relations

    Frederick Vinson was born in Louisa, Ky., on Jan. 22, 1890. He was elected to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Democrat in 1922, and while in Congress he befriended Missouri senator Harry S. Truman, who became his long-time friend. While in Washington, Vinson played a leading role in creating New Deal programs. In 1938 President Franklin D. R...

    During his seven-year tenure, Vinson found it difficult to work with a contentious Court dominated by strong personalities, including Hugo L. Black, Felix Frankfurter, Robert H. Jackson, and William O. Douglas. Assigning himself only a few majority opinions in major cases, he allowed his brethren to define and lead the debate over the constitutiona...

    In two major cases, Vinson upheld the government’s interest in protecting national security in spite of the individual rights at stake. Vinson’s opinion for the Court in American Communications Association v. Douds (1950)avoided the free-speech issue and upheld the constitutionality of Section 9 of the Taft-Hartley Act requiring labor union officer...

    Vinson’s record was mixed when national security issues were not as prominent. In Feiner v. New York (1951), he wrote the majority opinion convicting a speaker who refused to stop giving a haranguing speech to a crowd when requested by the police to do so. However, Vinson also wrote the majority decision in Kunz v. New York (1951), deciding that a ...

    The Vinson Court took decisive action against racial discrimination in housing, education, transportation, criminal justice, voting rights, and labor relations. A moderate on race relations, Vinson wrote unanimous opinions in two major cases. In Shelley v. Kraemer (1948), he held that judicial enforcement of racially restrictive housing covenants v...

  4. Birthplace. Frederick Moore Vinson (1890-1953) was the thirteenth Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1946 until his death on September 8, 1953. He joined the court in 1946 after a nomination from President Harry Truman. At the time of his nomination, he was the U.S. Secretary of the Treasury.

  5. Vinson was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt on November 26, 1937, to an Associate Justice seat on the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia. He was confirmed by the U.S. Senate that same year. Vinson resigned from the bench to become Director of the Office of Economic Stabilization during World War II.

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