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  1. House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha: William I King of Prussia, German Emperor 1797–1888: Christian IX King of Denmark 1818–1906: Victoria 1819–1901 r. 1837–1901: Albert Prince of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha 1819–1861: Alexander II Emperor of Russia 1855–1881: Frederick III German Emperor 1831–1888: Victoria Princess Royal 1840–1901: Edward ...

  2. 27/10/2021 · Haemophilia. Haemophilia acquired the name the royal disease due to the high number of descendants of Queen Victoria afflicted by it. The first instance of haemophilia in the British Royal family occurred on the birth of Prince Leopold on 7th April 1853, Leopold was the fourth son and eighth child of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha.

  3. 19/09/2022 · The bloodline of the current royal family can be traced back some 1,209 ... The Saxe-Coburg-Gotha name came into the British royal line in 1840 due to Queen Victoria’s marriage to Prince ...

  4. House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (AD 1901–1917) – Seychelles under British rule. House of Windsor (AD 1917–1976) – Seychelles under British rule; Somalia. Macrobia Kingdom – Legendary; House of Garen (AD 9th century–17th century) – Sultanate of Mogadishu and Ajuran Sultanate; Gobroon dynasty (AD 17th century–1910) – Sultanate of ...

  5. 01/11/2018 · In 1917, King George V decided he was over the family’s house name (probably because it was so long) and ordered it changed from Saxe-Coburg-Gotha to Windsor.

  6. 19/09/2022 · See all 24 heirs to the British throne. Then-Princess Elizabeth, Lieutenant Phillip Mountbatten, her then-fiance, her mother, then-Queen Elizabeth, (later the Queen Mother) and her father, King ...

  7. 12/09/2022 · Yet it is astonishing that the British and many in the West revere Elizabeth Alexandra May Windsor as "Queen Elizabeth 2nd," a queen regnant because of her "bloodline" — which ironically was from the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha, changed to House of Windsor only in 1917 by royal decree in the wake of intense anti-German sentiment in Britain after World War 1.