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  1. 01/01/2022 · 27/09/2021 · Amice FitzRobert, Countess of Gloucester (c. 1160-1220), second daughter, and co-heiress, of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester, and Hawise de Beaumont. Children Isabel de Clare 1178 Unknown Gilbert de Clare 1180, Hertford, Hertfordshire 25 Oct 1230 5th Earl of Hertford and 4th Earl of Gloucester, (or 1st Earl of Gloucester)

  2. thesource2.metro.net › conquering-the-countess_pdfConquering The Countess

    27/12/2021 · Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke - Wikipedia Isabel de Clare, suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke and Striguil (c. 1172 - 11 March 1220), was an Anglo-Irish noblewoman and one of the wealthiest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. She was the wife of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who served three successive kings as Marshal of

  3. 25/12/2021 · Isabel de Clare, 4th Countess of Pembroke - Wikipedia Isabel de Clare, suo jure 4th Countess of Pembroke and Striguil (c. 1172 - 11 March 1220), was an Anglo-Irish noblewoman and one of the wealthiest heiresses in Wales and Ireland. She was the wife of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke, who served three successive

  4. hace 6 días · List of nobles and magnates of England in the 13th century. During the 13th century England was partially ruled by Archbishops, Bishops, Earls (Counts), Barons, marcher Lords, and knights. All of these except for the knights would always hold most of their fiefs as tenant in chief. Although the kings maintained control of huge tracts of lands ...

  5. hace 2 días · Joan, Countess of Gloucester (1272–1307) Alphonso, Earl of Chester (1273–1284) Margaret, Duchess of Brabant (1275–1333) Mary of Woodstock (1278–1332), who became a nun; Isabella (1279–1279) Elizabeth, firstly Countess of Holland and on widowhood, secondly Countess of Hereford (1282–1316).

    • Nos. 30, 31 and 32
    • No. 33
    • No. 34
    • Nos. 35 and 36
    • No. 37
    • No. 38
    • No. 39
    • No. 40
    • No. 41
    • No. 42

    Nos. 30, 31 and 32 are all subsumed in the block of flatsgenerally known as Nos. 105–108 Park Lane, for which seepage 280. The original houses here, not built until the late1750's, lasted well with few external alterations until theirdemolition in 1930. (fn. 2) They had enjoyed no attachedstabling behind because of the presence of Dudley House,but they were good houses, straightforward in plan anduniform in elevation with the ground floors raised fivesteps above street level. There was a common cornice, anda bandcourse and stringcourse of stone between groundand first storeys (Plate 72a). No. 30, with a bay window andgarden towards Hyde Park, was naturally the best of them(Plate 67a). In 1813 the first-floor balcony was extended,probably by P. F. Robinson. (fn. 3) An inventory of 1827(when a new lease had just come into operation) valued thehouse at £5,953 with £704 for the furniture of the late Mrs.Earl(e). (fn. 4) In 1866 stucco dressings were applied to thewindows on both fronts...

    No. 33 remains, despite much alteration, one of themost important houses in Upper Brook Street (Plate 57,fig. 49: see also fig. 8b in vol. XXXIX). It was originallyerected under a sub-lease of 1756 to the mason EdmundRush (with John Spencer, carpenter, AlexanderRouchead, mason, and William Timbrell, esquire, asparties) and first occupied in 1757. (fn. 9) Little can be saidabout the house as first built except that it was probablysimilar to Nos. 30–32 in having the ground floor raised fivesteps above street level: there was also no stabling at therear. Following the death of the first occupant the housewas acquired in 1767 by John Boyd of Danson, Kent. (fn. 10) Boyd, a powerful City merchant and director of the EastIndia Company, had already built the small country villaof Danson Park to designs by Robert Taylor, and was toenjoy an interest in later houses of Taylor's in GraftonStreet. Here too, there can be little doubt that he called inTaylor (to whom the rate collector was referre...

    No. 34, like No. 33, was erected under a lease of 1756 tothe mason, Edmund Rush. (fn. 19) It is still essentially aGeorgian house with a modest two-bay front, originally ofbrick but now wholly covered with channelled stucco. Theground storey was stuccoed before 1918—perhaps in theearly nineteenth century—and the upper storeys after1930—probably during 'works' in 1933–4. (fn. 20) There is asimple original doorcase of the type formerly also at Nos.31 and 32, with a flat hood supported on a pair of brackets.Within, there is a confined central staircase, but much ofthe interior has been 'scraped'. A bay at the back waspresent from at least 1810, extending through only the firstand second storeys. (fn. 21) Little is known of later alterations.The front was 'done up' in 1880–1, and in 1933–4 works tothe value of £1,000 were carried out for the Estate byGeorge Trollope and Sons. (fn. 22) A major renovation byHaslemere Estates Limited in 1973–4 led to the addition ofaccommodation on top and...

    Nos. 35 and 36 are externally among the best preservedGeorgian houses on the estate, and No. 36 can also boastthe survival of many original features inside (Plate 54a, 54b,figs. 50–1: see also Plate 6b, fig. 2f in vol. XXXIX). Theywere both first sub-leased in 1737 (with AlexanderRouchead, mason, as a consenting party) to AnthonyCross, an obscure mason from West Ham. (fn. 24) Neitherhouse was occupied until 1742, when Cross sold them bothto John, sixth Baron Ward. (fn. 25) The Ward family hadalready in 1737 acquired an interest in other landhereabouts, and in c. 1757 Lord Ward himself was to buildthe first Dudley House immediately south of Nos. 30–36,on a site which from the first had restricted the depth of allthese houses (see page 277). Until then, Ward lived in No.36 and let No. 35, which was first occupied in about 1746by the Duchess of Atholl. (fn. 26) The quality and felicity of the elevations of the twohouses hint that an architect may have been involved.They were clearly bu...

    No. 37 was the first house on this side of Upper BrookStreet east of Park Lane unconstricted by the site ofDudley House behind, and therefore enjoying a full depththrough to King Street Mews (now Culross Street). It isessentially all of 1907–8, though some negligible tracesmay remain of the original house, built under a lease of1736 and first occupied in about 1742. (fn. 31) This housereceived the customary updating with porch and balconyin 1864, but little else is known of it. (fn. 32) In 1907 thecontractors Matthews, Rogers and Company applied for abuilding lease, and a virtual reconstruction under theirarchitect Maurice Hulbert then followed, with a garage inplace of the old stables at the back. (fn. 33)The front elevation isan ornamented but dignified composition in Portlandstone of five storeys above ground with good ironwork, andthe plan shows the ability evidenced by Hulbert in otherhouses designed by him on the estate. Occupants include: Lord Mark Kerr, general, son of 1stMa...

    No. 38 is still essentially the house built here and subleased to Isaac Mansfield, plasterer, in 1736, (fn. 34) though thepresent front elevation is not the original. As a house ofrestricted frontage (twenty-five feet), it had a staircasebetween the front and back rooms, which were connectedby a lobby (fn. 21)(fig. 3c in vol. XXXIX). Two fireplaces andvarious internal features (chiefly cornices, doors andskirting-boards) are basically of the 1730's. Several alterations occurred in the early nineteenthcentury, perhaps beginning in 1800–1 when the house wasempty. (fn. 11) By 1819 the front door had been enlarged andgiven a fanlight, and the staircase had received a metalbalustrade, though for a while it was left in its originalposition. At the back a ballroom had been added over thestables at what is now No. 28 Culross Street. (fn. 35) Latterly thefront had a stucco facing and Italianate window dressings,but these have all been removed (probably in 1931 (fn. 36) )leaving the façade wi...

    No. 39, a house of restricted frontage, was rebuilt by thearchitects Wimperis and Simpson in 1914–15. Its predecessor, first occupied in 1742 and planned with a stairbetween front and back rooms, was badly damaged by firein 1861. (fn. 39) The tenant at this time was the well-knownpaper manufacturer John Dickinson, who frequently heldliterary parties here, always employing an outside caterer'as his wife could not cope with any but the simplesthousekeeping'. (fn. 40) In 1913 rebuilding by A. C. F. Hill of F. Foxley andCompany to designs supplied by Wimperis and Simpsonwas sanctioned. The mews premises facing Culross Streethaving been divided off, a house of some elegance wasplanned behind a plainish front in Portland stone. Acurving staircase debouches at ground level into a spacioushall of full width; beyond comes a bowed room withpassages on either flank leading to a single-storey room,bowed this time at both ends and decorated in an Adamtaste. In front of the blank wall of the mews...

    No. 40, though never rebuilt from the foundations,retains almost nothing of the character of the house subleased to John Simmons, carpenter, in 1736. (fn. 42)Three latersets of alterations seem chiefly responsible for thistransformation. 'Yesterday', wrote William Beckford in March 1819,'the Calf ushered into my room, when I least expected it,Sweetness in person [Philip Wyatt, architect son of JamesWyatt]—more hirsute, bearded and baboon-like than thefantastic faces one can see on coconuts; very amiable, verythin, pretty poor I don't doubt, but bursting with sublimeplans. He has been in Paris and goes back there the dayafter tomorrow under the orders of a new Fortunate Youthworth £800,000, who bears the illustrious name of Ball,or something of the kind, the heir and bastard of a LadyHughes, widow of an admiral (despoiler of the Indies) ofthat name.... He is making a pied-à-terre for the saidFortunate One (who'll be twenty-one in a month or two) inBrook Street for the modest price of...

    No. 41 is a handsome stone-fronted house, completelyrebuilt in 1906–7 to designs by R. Selden Wornum. Theprevious house here, sub-leased in 1736 to John Brown,bricklayer, and Anthony Cross, mason, was substantial. (fn. 53) In 1776 it was the subject of alterations to the value ofnearly £1,300, following its purchase by Sir WilliamBagot. The chief figure in these works, the nature of whichis obscure, was the local carpenter and builder GeorgeShakespear, but Kenton Couse valued some of the workand Richard Westmacott the elder carved one chimneypiece of statuary marble. (fn. 1) (fn. 54)One or two survivingchimneypieces may date from this campaign. The Bagot family long retained the house, but nofurther changes by them are known. Then in 1851 as acondition for a new lease, Sir Henry Meux and hisarchitect Samuel Beazley were obliged to improve andraise the front in accordance with a drawing by ThomasCundy II. It was to have the same porch, Ionic pilasters onthe upper storeys and arched g...

    No. 42 is now a small but ingeniously planned block offlats, erected in 1928–9. The preceding house here, subleased in 1735, (fn. 58) was largely rebuilt in about 1843–4 afterthe builder James Ponsford had acquired an interest in it. (fn. 59) Ponsford gave the house an effective elevation in stuccowith a portico and arched windows to the ground floor, aniron balustrade above and, more individually, Ionicpilasters running through the second and third storeys. In1862, however, the iron balustrade was replaced by theinexorable Thomas Cundy II with one of Portland stonelike that insisted upon at No. 41 (fn. 60)(Plate 54c). In 1913–14 G. H. Trollope of the builders Trollope andColls acquired the site for rebuilding and demolished theold house. The idea seems to have been to treat it inconnexion with the whole corner block along Park Street(later occupied by Upper Brook Feilde), which Trollopewas also to take. But war delayed the outcome and alteredthese plans. (fn. 61) A design for a ver...

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