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  1. Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Prince of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel was the Prince of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and a military leader. His titles are usually shortened to Duke of Brunswick in English-language sources. He succeeded his father as sovereign prince of the Principality of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel, one of the princely states of the Holy Roman Empire. The duke was a cultured and benevolent despot in the model of his ...

  2. Ferdinand, Prince of Brunswick-Lüneburg (12 January 1721, Wolfenbüttel – 3 July 1792, Vechelde ), was a German-Prussian field marshal (1758–1766) known for his participation in the Seven Years' War. From 1757 to 1762 he led an Anglo-German army in Western Germany which successfully repelled French attempts to occupy Hanover . Contents 1 Early life

    • Declaration of Pillnitz?
    • Republicans?
    • Name
    • Name and Number
    • Carl Gauss Patronage
    • Hyphens After A Standard -ly Adverb

    This isn't my area of study at all, but I can't find any other real mention of this "Brunswick Proclamation" or "Brunswick Manifesto". Is it possible that someone's mixing this up with (or is this in part of) the Declaration of Pillnitz that was issued by Emperor Leopold II and Frederick William II of Prussia around the same time? --Ricky8168200:35...

    Also, the Republicans that are mentioned either needs to be explain on the Republican disambiguation page in the context of the French Revolutionary Wars or needs to be linked to the proper group. --Ricky8168200:35, Nov 8, 2004 (UTC)

    For all other rulers of the time we use the English version of the name, e.g. Frederick William III of Prussia. Is there a reason we aren't doing it here? Chl 13:09, 29 April 2006 (UTC)Reply[reply]

    What is the basis for calling him "Charles II"? Most sources I've seen use "Charles William Ferdinand" and call his grandson "Charles II". See, for example, the Allgemeine Deutsche Biographie, which calls the subject of this article "Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand" and the grandson "Karl II". I'm going to move. john k (talk) 06:06, 6 September 2010 (UTC)Re...

    It should be added that the Duke of Brunswick supported Carl Friedrich Gauss' education. Gauss was one of the greatest mathematicians ever. — Preceding unsigned comment added by Ffel (talk • contribs) 13:59, 18 January 2011 (UTC)Reply[reply] 1. I've added some suitable text, with a reference taken from Gauss' article. Modest Genius talk 13:54, 28 J...

    @Modest Genius: I quoted chapter and verse of the MOS in my edit summary, but somehow you did not find, read and absorb this part of WP:HYPHEN: "Avoid using a hyphen after a standard -ly adverb (a newly available home, a wholly owned subsidiary)". The hyphens do not help the reader. Chris the speller yack 13:07, 14 June 2016 (UTC)Reply[reply] 1. Th...

  3. Charles William Ferdinand, Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg, Prince of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel (German: Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand von Braunschweig-Wolfenbüttel; 9 October 1735 – 10 November 1806) was the Prince of Brunswick-Wolfenbüttel and Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg and a military leader.

  4. 06/11/2022 · Charles William Ferdinand of Brunswick, German Karl Wilhelm Ferdinand, (born Oct. 9, 1735, Wolfenbüttel, Lower Saxony [Germany]—died Nov. 10, 1806, Ottensen, near Hamburg), duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg-Wolfenbüttel, Prussian field marshal, and an enlightened ruler. Though he was Frederick II the Great’s nephew and favourite disciple, Charles proved ...

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