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  1. 04/08/2022 · The Most Noble Order of the Garter was founded by Edward III of England in 1348. Dates shown are of nomination or installation; coloured rows indicate sovereigns, princes of Wales, medieval ladies modern royal knights and ladies and stranger knights and ladies, none of whom counts toward the 24-member limit. Founders · Edward III · Richard II

    • Manors and Other Estates.
    • Economic history.
    • Local Government.
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    T.R.E. theabbey of St. Mary, Winchester (Nunnaminster),held an estate at Urchfont which then apparentlycovered the entire ancient parish but which laterdivided to form several distinct estates, all held ofthe abbey (see below). (fn. 45) Nunnaminster retained themanor of URCHFONT until it was suppressed in1536. Although some of the house's possessio...

    Urchfont contained landfor twenty ploughs in 1086. There were sevenploughs on the six demesne hides and nine elsewhere on the estate. Meadow was reckoned at 64 a.and there was pasture a league long and half aleague broad. (fn. 180) There were 65 customary tenants on the manor in1086, of whom 17 worked on the demesne lands. (fn. 181) There were 19 f...

    The jurisdiction of theabbey of St. Mary, Winchester, and of the house'ssuccessors after the Dissolution, extended over theentire ancient parish. (fn. 267) Records of courts are extantfor 1260, 135599, 1498, 1500, 1517, 152630,15468, 15879, 161538 (entries for 162830 and1633 are wanting), 172543, 174371, and 178999. (fn. 268) In the 14th century th...

    St. Mary's Abbey, Winchester(Nunnaminster) presented rectors to the churchof Urchfont from at least the early 13th centuryuntil 1382. (fn. 285) In the earlier 13th century, probablyc. 1232, the rector, John Griffin, endowed a vicaragewithin the church and appointed a chaplain,Richard de Stokes, to it. Griffin's endowment wasconfirmed by the bishop ...

    Quakerism was firmly implanted in the area by the later 17th century and wasprobably brought to Urchfont by Samuel Noyes, aserge-maker from Devizes. Noyes was active in theparish by 1658 when he spoke in the church there atthe conclusion of a service. He was subsequentlyfined for the offence and on his refusal to pay wasimprisoned. (fn. 349) The Fr...

    In 1808 five 'petty' schools in theparish were attended by 22 boys and 36 girls. (fn. 365) A day-school in Urchfont accommodating some 40children was supported by subscribers in 1818. (fn. 366) In 1833 the school was attended by 40 boys and10 girls. (fn. 367) It may have been this school, thought tobe unsatisfactory, where 7 boys and 10 girls weret...

    Before 1786 aperson surnamed More gave 50 to be investedfor the benefit of the parish. (fn. 377) The capital wasreported to yield 1 10s. yearly. In 1834 no payments had apparently been made for at least 25 yearsand some of the older parishioners maintained thatthe capital had previously been used to set up aspinning establishment to employ parish p...

  2. en.wikipedia.org › wiki › Edward_VIEdward VI - Wikipedia

    29/07/2022 · Signature. Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) was King of England and Ireland from 28 January 1547 until his death in 1553. He was crowned on 20 February 1547 at the age of nine. [1] Edward was the son of Henry VIII and Jane Seymour and the first English monarch to be raised as a Protestant. [2]

  3. 30/07/2022 · Totnes is a Parliamentary constituency[n 1] represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since December 2019 by Conservative Anthony Mangnall. Mangnall defeated incumbent Dr Sarah Wollaston who had originally been elected as a Conservative but defected to the Liberal Democrats earlier that year.[n 2]

    • Puriton
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    • Castle and Borough
    • Social Life
    • Puriton and Downend
    • Puriton and Crandon
    • Rectory
    • Agriculture

    The ancient parish of Puriton lies on the gentle northern slope of the Polden ridge at its western end. The arable fields occupied the top of the slope, its grassland mostly on Puriton Level to the north and north-east and beside the river Parrett to the south-west. The parish includes the large but compact village of Puriton, 5 km. north-east of B...

    The probable Roman road along the Poldens from Ilchester left the ridge south of Woolavington for the port near Crandon Bridge. (fn. 8) A route westwards, probably contemporary, led north-west up Puriton Hill to Pawlett and thence either westward to the Parrett crossing at Combwich or northward towards Huntspill, Highbridge, and Bristol. Part was k...

    There were said to be 32 households in the parish in the 17th century. (fn. 14) In 1801 the population was 332. It increased rapidly in the 1820s, fell in the 1830s, but again increased, reaching a peak in 1881 with 753 people. Thereafter it declined, particularly in the 1890s, and by 1911 had reached 612. In the 1920s growth began and was increase...

    Iron-age and Romano-British settlements are indicated west of Puriton village and there are traces of linear banks and ditches of field systems on Puriton Level to the north. (fn. 16) Puriton village is on the gentle northern slope of the Poldens and appears to have developed from two roughly parallel streets with the church and a small green known...

    The name Caput Montis, (fn. 28) later Chefdelmunt (fn. 29) or Chisley Mount, (fn. 30) was given in the later 12th century (fn. 31) to the prominent western end of the Polden ridge where a castle has been identified and a borough was established. The form la Donend, later Downend, occurs in 1281. (fn. 32) A mound, thought to be a motte, was excavate...

    There were three victuallers in the parish in 1620 (fn. 51) and Richard Meaker, in business in 1674, had been succeeded by Elizabeth Meaker by 1687. (fn. 52) By 1861 there were two inns, the Puriton inn, at the top of Puriton Hill, near the crossroads between the village and Downend, and the Exchange at Downend. (fn. 53) Both remained in business i...

    Three hides of land at Pirition, assumed to be Puriton, formed part of Gastonbury abbey's estate by 854. (fn. 59) In 1066 six hides at Puriton were held by Queen Edith. By 1086 possession had passed to the church of St. Peter in Rome. (fn. 60) By 1186–7 Maud de Chandos, widow of Philip de Columbers (I) (d. c. 1185) and a descendant of Alfred d'Epai...

    In 1243 Thomas Trivet held land in Puriton. (fn. 85) He or a namesake died in 1281 holding ⅛ fee of John de Columbers there and land at Downend as well as an estate at Crandon in Bawdrip. (fn. 86) He was succeeded by his son (Sir) William who died in 1314 when his heir was his grandson Thomas. (fn. 87) Thomas died in 1316 and was succeeded by his p...

    Before 1200–01 the rectory had been acquired by Goldcliff priory (Mon., now Gwent). (fn. 122) It was in the hands of the Crown by 1338 (fn. 123) and so remained until 1387 or later. (fn. 124) Tewkesbury abbey was granted Goldcliff property in 1441 (fn. 125) and the issues were received on its behalf by the prior of St. James's, Bristol. (fn. 126) I...

    In 1086 Puriton was a single estate assessed at 6 hides but taxed on 5, which had arable land for 12 ploughteams. The demesne farm measured 3 hides and had 2 teams and 4 serfs. Tenants, described as 11 villeins and 4 bordars, had 6 teams. There were 300 a. of grassland, half meadow and half pasture, and the demesne supported 2 cows and 60 sheep. Th...

  4. 04/08/2022 · Seymour, Mary (d. 1673) Countess of Winchelsea. Name variations: Countess of Winchilsea. Died before April 10, 1673; daughter of Frances Devereux (d. 1674) and William Seymour (1587–1660), 2nd duke of Somerset (r. 1660–1660); became first wife of Heneage Finch, 3rd earl of Winchelsea (r. 1639–1689), before 1653.

  5. 30/07/2022 · In 1802 it was acquired by William Bloxam of Lombard Street, stationer, in whose family it still remains. He married Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Isherwood, and had nine sons and daughters. William Bloxam was appointed a Governor of the Grammar School on 21st February, 1802, and died on 6th August, 1814, aged 68.